The Campaign for the Accurate Measurement of Creativity.

When I was really little, like five or six years old, my parents’ friend Greg, a contractor in the small town where I grew up, showed me a device he’d created. My five-year-old brain remembers it being enormous. It took two of my little hands, and then some, to hold it. It looked like something out of a Tim Burton movie. Sheets of metal were riveted together. It was this big silver cylinder that tapered into a cone shape on one end. At the tail end of the cone, a little, pink eraser from a Number Two pencil stuck out. It was a glorified electric eraser, which he used on his drafting table. Since then, I developed a fascination with taking pens and pencils — particularly mechanical pencils — apart and finding new ways to make them work. I’ve attached pen caps to Chapstick; I’ve taken ink and tried to dry it around graphite to make blue pencils; In fifth and sixth grade, I even used to cut Bic pens in half, shove a red ink pen into one side and a blue ink pen into the other side, and sell them to my classmates for $5. Called them “Two Color Shorties.”

This is why, when I saw my friend, industrial designer Craighton Berman had tipped his hat to the current Mason Jar Craze by topping one with a pencil sharpener, I had to jump on board.

On a conference call the other day, Joe Gannon asked, “And how many of you have actually supported a Kickstarter?” Only one of us replied that we had, in fact, put money into a Kickstarter. I’m writing today on behalf my friend Craighton to let you know I supported this, and I think you should, too.

The Campaign for the Accurate Measurement of Creativity.

Comments

  1. I love the idea! Seems so obvious so must be genius!

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